• Barbara Crossette

    About Barbara Crossette

    Barbara Crossette is the senior consulting editor and writer for PassBlue, a fellow of the Ralph Bunche Institute for International Studies at The Graduate Center, CUNY, and the United Nations correspondent for The Nation. She is also a board member of the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

    Previously, Crossette was the UN bureau chief for The New York Times from 1994 to 2001 and before that its chief correspondent in Southeast Asia and South Asia. She is the author of "So Close to Heaven: The Vanishing Buddhist Kingdoms of the Himalayas," "The Great Hill Stations of Asia" and a Foreign Policy Association study, "India Changes Course," in the Foreign Policy Association's "Great Decisions 2015."

    Crossette won the George Polk award for her coverage in India of the assassination of Rajiv Gandhi in 1991 and the 2010 Shorenstein Prize for her writing on Asia.

    In Nunavut, Poor Health Care Shortens Indigenous People’s Lives

    by  • May 14, 2018 • Gender-Based Violence, Health and Population • 

    Canada’s national health system, the envy of many people in other countries, including in the United States, is being more scrutinized from Canadians as reports reveal serious health-service gaps in the territory of Nunavut, a self-governing province populated by mostly Inuit people. Critical reports of deprivation and neglect emerging from Nunavut paint a picture...

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    Europe’s Contraception Gaps: They May Be Wider Than You Think

    by  • April 29, 2018 • Climate and Environment, Health and Population, Take a Look • 

    It is a continent where almost half of the pregnancies are unplanned, where government agencies do not provide enough information on available contraception, where geography is destiny for those needing reliable family planning advice. This is not a developing region, but 21st-century Europe, according to the recently published 2018 Contraception Atlas. The atlas, presented...

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    South Africa’s Light on Human Rights Dims Again at the UN

    by  • April 17, 2018 • Africa, Human Rights, US Foreign Relations, US-UN Relations • 

    When the monthlong winter session of the United Nations Human Rights Council opened at the end of February, expectations were high that progress would be made on reforms demanded by the United States and supported by many other nations, although not in as threatening terms as those of Nikki Haley, the Trump administration’s ambassador...

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    Data Miners See Poverty Gradations; and More Cases of Harassment at the UN

    by  • April 11, 2018 • Gender-Based Violence, Poverty, Take a Look • 

    International organizations, governments and a vast army of nongovernmental organizations justifiably welcome the sharp reductions that have been achieved in global poverty in recent decades. Data researchers show, however, that when it comes to defining who are the poorest, poverty is not a monolithic state. Two analysts from the online site Our World in...

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    Reform Eludes the Human Rights Council as Bolton Returns to the Scene

    by  • April 1, 2018 • Human Rights, Nikki Haley Watch, US Foreign Relations, US-UN Relations • 

    The 2018 winter session of the United Nations Human Rights Council was marked more by what didn’t happen than what did. There was still no official announcement in Geneva from the Trump administration about whether the United States would leave the Council or even seek re-election in 2019, when its current term expires. There was...

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    US Congress Strikes Back at Trump’s Goals to Curtail Family Planning

    by  • March 25, 2018 • Gender-Based Violence, LGBT, US Foreign Relations, US-UN Relations, Women • 

    In a rare act of legislative sabotage, the Trump administration’s plan to starve international family planning of funds has been killed for now as committees in both the United States House of Representatives and the Senate slipped hundreds of millions of dollars to support reproductive health programs into a 2,232-page, $1.3 trillion US budget...

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    The UN Secretary-General Pushes Ahead on Peacekeeping Reform

    by  • March 16, 2018 • Peace and Security, Secretary-General, UN Peacekeeping, US-UN Relations • 

    Responding to a December request from the General Assembly for details on how he proposes to staff and pay for sweeping changes in political affairs and peacekeeping at the United Nations, Secretary-General António Guterres has drafted a 50-page explanation for member states to consider. The General Assembly had agreed in principle to his original...

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    Trump Team Wants to Slash Funds for Global Women’s Health by Half

    by  • February 18, 2018 • Health and Population, Humanitarian Aid, Poverty, Take a Look, US Foreign Relations • 

    There has yet to be a decision in United States Congress on what funds for global women’s health, if any, will survive in the current 2018 national budget, a decision that is nearly six months overdue. But Donald Trump and his vice president, Mike Pence, a hard-line social conservative who is playing a larger...

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    The ‘Incredible Courage’ of Asma Jahangir, Pakistan’s Human-Rights Advocate

    by  • February 17, 2018 • Asia, Human Rights, Women • 

    Only a few days before Pakistan’s most famous human-rights advocate, Asma Jahangir, was felled by a heart attack on Feb. 11, she was speaking out in support of a group of ethnic Pashtuns who had marched across the country from their homes along the Afghanistan border to protest military brutality. A Pashtun boy had...

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    A Trove of Resources for Navigating Our Angry World

    by  • February 6, 2018 • Governance, Journalists, Peace and Security, Take a Look • 

    In the dark shadows of rising populism and hypernationalistic leaders, attempts to intimidate reporters and curb the exchange of information are taking on less visibly crude but still dangerous forms. The menace, highlighted in the United States by Donald Trump’s contemptuous accusations against the press, television and social media, has global echoes. There is...

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    In Africa, Where the Pain of Trump’s ‘Racist’ Comments Runs Deep

    by  • January 17, 2018 • Africa, Caribbean, Geopolitics, US Foreign Relations, US-UN Relations • 1 Comment

    In the United States, the reaction to the bigoted comments that President Donald Trump made on Jan. 11 about black-majority nations in Africa didn’t take long to shift its focus to domestic American politics, obscuring the shock of those abroad who have been maligned. Around the world, a very different story is taking shape....

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    Zimbabwe Stuck With a Health Crisis Left by Mugabe Era

    by  • January 10, 2018 • Africa, Asia, Climate and Environment, Take a Look • 2 Comments

    Robert Mugabe, the only head of state that Zimbabwe had known since independence in 1980, was forced out of office by an unexpected coup in November 2017, and citizens of the economically battered country are now forced to tally the costs of his dictatorship. One of them is a health system in collapse. A...

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    Tackling Sexual Violence in Humanitarian NGOs

    by  • December 31, 2017 • Gender-Based Violence, Humanitarian Aid, Take a Look • 

    Nearly three years ago, Megan Nobert, a humanitarian worker in South Sudan, was drugged and raped by an employee of a United Nations agency, according to her account, made public six months later. That was when Nobert decided to form the advocacy group Report the Abuse to encourage others to tell their stories and...

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    David Miliband on Our Duty to the Strangers in Our Midst: Refugees

    by  • December 19, 2017 • Geopolitics, Poverty, Refugees • 

    David Miliband, a former British foreign secretary, has been president and chief executive of the International Rescue Committee since 2013, overseeing both the agency’s humanitarian relief operations and its refugee resettlement and assistance programs in several American cities. The son of European refugees from Nazi Germany, he just published his first book, “Rescue: Refugees and...

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    Is the US Going to Drop Out of the UN Human Rights Council?

    by  • December 17, 2017 • Geopolitics, Israeli-Palestinian conflict, Security Council, US Foreign Relations, US-UN Relations • 

    Palestinian causes in the United Nations are gaining wider and more active support in the Arab and Islamic worlds in light of Donald Trump’s recognition of Jerusalem as Israel’s capital, in defiance of global opinion and decades of UN resolutions. The move sets the scene for reigniting intense anti-UN activity in United States Congress....

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    Girl, Disrupted: How a Boarding School Shifted the Life of One Young Woman

    by  • December 13, 2017 • Asia, India, Poverty • 

    Shilpa Raj is not a Bollywood name, though she has starred in a documentary. She is not a best-selling author — yet. But she has written a frank, soulful book that can contribute to important discussions about the human costs of a disrupted childhood, however well-intentioned, based on her own extraordinary story. At the...

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