• About Barbara Crossette

    Barbara Crossette is contributing editor and writer for PassBlue, a fellow of the Ralph Bunche Institute for International Studies at The Graduate Center, CUNY, and the United Nations correspondent for The Nation. She is also a board member of the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

    Previously, Crossette was the UN bureau chief for The New York Times from 1994 to 2001 and before that its chief correspondent in Southeast Asia and South Asia. She is the author of "So Close to Heaven: The Vanishing Buddhist Kingdoms of the Himalayas," "The Great Hill Stations of Asia" and a Foreign Policy Association study, "India Changes Course," in the Foreign Policy Association's "Great Decisions 2015."

    Crossette won the George Polk award for her coverage in India of the assassination of Rajiv Gandhi in 1991 and the 2010 Shorenstein Prize for her writing on Asia.

    Take a Look: New Research and Data Online for Fact-Checking

    by  • January 11, 2017 • Africa, Asia, Human Rights, Peace and Security • 

    In the arcane language of diplomacy, a special section is reserved for navigating linguistic traps in negotiating peace agreements. One of many examples is the 1995 Oslo II interim agreement with Israel on the future of the West Bank and Gaza, which nearly broke down over the translation of one small Arabic word, ra’is. Was...

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    In a Single Day, US Congress Castigates Both the UN and Obama Over Israeli Vote

    by  • January 6, 2017 • Health and Population, Israeli-Palestinian conflict, Middle East, Security Council, UN Agencies • 

    While Washington is caught up in the unfolding drama about the extent and motives of Russian hacking and possible attempted manipulation of the 2016 American presidential election, another story is playing out around threats to “punish” the United Nations. On Jan.5, the United States House of Representatives voted to repudiate the Security Council resolution...

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    The $64,000 Question: Can the UN Survive the Trump Era?

    by  • December 4, 2016 • Special Report, UN Agencies, US Foreign Relations, US-UN Relations • 1 Comment

    Celebrators at the opening of the New UN House in Ashgabat, the capital of Turkmenistan, on Nov. 26, 2016.

    The United Nations will swear in António Guterres as its ninth secretary-general on Dec. 12, when the organization will be only weeks away from the inauguration of Donald Trump and the potentially most threatening, hostile political opposition to the UN ever assembled in Washington, D.C. The UN will have to be prepared to respond...

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    In the US Congress, a Campaign Opens to ‘Punish’ the UN

    by  • December 26, 2016 • Security Council, US Foreign Relations, US-UN Relations • 

    It was inevitable that a triumphant Republican government in Washington, D.C., would sooner or later launch an assault on the United Nations. A near-unanimous UN Security Council resolution on Dec. 23 condemning Israeli settlements on Palestinians’ land provided the trigger. That the administration of President Barack Obama stood aside with an abstention, allowing a...

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    Note to Trump: US and Chinese Publics Want Their Nations to Be Active in World Affairs

    by  • December 20, 2016 • Asia, Governance, Peace and Security, US Foreign Relations • 

    Barely a day before Donald Trump set off a recent diplomatic crisis between China and the United States by backing Taiwan in a chatty phone call with the island’s president, the Chicago Council on Global Affairs published poll results from the US and China that found a surprising correlation between public attitudes in the...

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    Nikki Haley, as US Envoy to the UN, Could Empower Indian Business Ties

    by  • December 2, 2016 • Nuclear Disarmament, Security Council, US Foreign Relations, US-UN Relations • 

    Whatever the real reason that led Donald Trump to name Nikki Haley as his ambassador to the United Nations — that she is a “deal-maker,” a woman from an ethnic minority and a moderate Republican voice he may want to remove from South Carolina — a wave of justifiable pride in many Indians and...

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    Being UN Deputy Secretary-General: Louise Fréchette Recounts Her Experience

    by  • November 12, 2016 • General Assembly, US-UN Relations, Women • 

    Louise Fréchette, a Canadian, was the first United Nations deputy secretary-general. Appointed by Kofi Annan, she took office in March 1998, bringing to the job qualifications that exceeded those of most UN secretaries-general. She had spent a quarter-century in the Canadian foreign service, including as ambassador to several Latin American counties and to the...

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    Murders of Journalists by Militants Just Keep Coming, a Report Finds

    by  • November 2, 2016 • Journalists, Unesco • 

    Somalia, Iraq and Syria lead the world in the killing of journalists by Islamic extremists who get away with their crimes, but militants also continue to target the media with impunity in Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Nigeria and Pakistan, according to the latest report from the Committee to Protect Journalists, a nonprofit group based in New...

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    South African Decision to Quit the ICC Draws Critics in Africa and Beyond

    by  • October 24, 2016 • Africa, ICC, International Justice • 

    South Africa’s announcement on Oct. 21 that it intends to withdraw from the International Criminal Court, which has jurisdiction over war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide, has met strong opposition from civil society groups in that country and other African and international human-rights organizations. Africa has played major roles in the independent court,...

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    Young US Graduates Falter in Knowledge of World Affairs, a Survey Finds

    by  • October 7, 2016 • Education • 

    In a crucial political year when candidates’ knowledge — or ignorance — of international affairs and foreign policy are topics among public debate in the United States, a new survey of what young Americans of college age, many of them first-time voters, really know about the world produced some sobering findings. The joint survey, commissioned...

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