• About Barbara Crossette

    Barbara Crossette is contributing editor and writer for PassBlue, a fellow of the Ralph Bunche Institute for International Studies at The Graduate Center, CUNY, and the United Nations correspondent for The Nation. She is also a board member of the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

    Previously, Crossette was the UN bureau chief for The New York Times from 1994 to 2001 and before that its chief correspondent in Southeast Asia and South Asia. She is the author of "So Close to Heaven: The Vanishing Buddhist Kingdoms of the Himalayas," "The Great Hill Stations of Asia" and a Foreign Policy Association study, "India Changes Course," in the Foreign Policy Association's "Great Decisions 2015."

    Crossette won the George Polk award for her coverage in India of the assassination of Rajiv Gandhi in 1991 and the 2010 Shorenstein Prize for her writing on Asia.

    As China Becomes a Major Player in UN Peacekeeping, Will It Respond to Crises?

    by  • August 17, 2016 • Africa, Gender-Based Violence, Human Rights, Peace and Security, UN Peacekeeping • 

    Mission SK -Bukavu-Pakistani Brigade Medal Parade -23rd March 2011 Pakistani Blue Helmets brigade comprised of approximate 3500 personnel were given UN medals for their service in the UN Mission. The troops will be rotated by the end of May-2011. Photos MONUSCO/ Myriam Asmani

    As China has projected its economic and military power more widely not only in Asia but also in Africa and to some extent in Latin America, little notice has been paid by the general public to another arena of growing influence: United Nations peacekeeping. In coming weeks, the Chinese are expected to announce the...

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    Religious Intolerance Surges Worldwide, US Studies Confirm

    by  • August 15, 2016 • Human Rights, Refugees • 

    tktktk

    Burmese Buddhists attack Muslims and Christians. Indian Hindu zealots kill Muslims and Christians and trash their places of worship. In the Central African Republic, Muslims are driven from the country by Christians. The Middle East and parts of North Africa are aflame with sectarian violence, and religious minorities are the most vulnerable to persecution,...

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    Less Politics and More Transparency: What New Leadership Will Mean for the UN

    by  • July 6, 2016 • General Assembly, Secretary-General, UN Diplomats • 

    Mogens Lykketoft MANUEL ELIAS/UN PHOTO

    In a year when people who follow the United Nations are focusing on the election of the next secretary-general, the center of early action in that election has moved for the first time in history from the secretive deliberations of the Security Council to an unprecedented open campaign in the General Assembly, which normally...

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    New Candidates for Secretary-General Make Their Cases at the UN

    by  • June 7, 2016 • Secretary-General • 

    Lajcak

    The field of nine candidates campaigning formally to become the next United Nations secretary-general grew by two on June 7, when Miroslav Lajcak, Slovakia’s foreign minister, and Susana Malcorra, who holds the same position in Argentina, spoke in public sessions lasting more than two hours each, taking questions from UN member delegates and civil...

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    Fixing UN Peacekeeping Operations: The World’s Most Complicated Army

    by  • May 23, 2016 • Africa, Gender-Based Violence, Secretary-General, UN Peacekeeping, Women's Issues • 

    Jane Holl Lute

    It has been almost a year since a sweeping assessment of United Nations peacekeeping operations by experts recommended significant changes from top to bottom: a reformed hierarchy in New York and greater coordination and discipline among military contingents in ever-more dangerous missions around the world. Few of their substantive ideas have been adopted. As...

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    Failing Public Schools Spur Global Boom in Private Education

    by  • May 16, 2016 • Education, India, Sustainable Development Goals, Unesco • 

    Chinese Children

    While governments bask in data showing that the development goal of universal access to primary education has largely been achieved, attention is turning to what that really means in the classroom. Educators and human-rights advocates question whether acceptable standards are being met in many schools, as evidence mounts of the proliferation of private education...

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    John Kerry Celebrates Diversity (and His Niece) at UN School Graduation

    by  • June 4, 2016 • Education, US Foreign Relations • 1 Comment

    US Secretary of State John Kerry, giving remarks at the United Nations International School's commencement, June 2, 2106, held at the UN. US STATE DEPARTMENT

    For the class of 2016 at the United Nations International School in Manhattan, graduation on June 2 was a special event, held in the United Nations General Assembly Hall. The speaker was Secretary of State John Kerry, who seized the moment in a turbulent, narrowly focused political year in the United States to praise...

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    The Field Grows and Shifts in the Race for UN Secretary-General

    by  • June 1, 2016 • General Assembly, Secretary-General, Security Council, Women's Issues • 

    Susana Malcorra LOEY FELIPE/UN PHOTO

    The second crop of campaigners making a pitch to replace Ban Ki-moon in January is now being assembled, and it looks like the first declared candidate on the list may well shake up the race. She is Susana Malcorra, Argentina’s foreign minister and a well-respected, internationally known former United Nations official. The next round...

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