• About Barbara Crossette

    Barbara Crossette is contributing editor and writer for PassBlue, a fellow of the Ralph Bunche Institute for International Studies at The Graduate Center, CUNY, and the United Nations correspondent for The Nation. She is also a board member of the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

    Previously, Crossette was the UN bureau chief for The New York Times from 1994 to 2001 and before that its chief correspondent in Southeast Asia and South Asia. She is the author of "So Close to Heaven: The Vanishing Buddhist Kingdoms of the Himalayas," "The Great Hill Stations of Asia" and a Foreign Policy Association study, "India Changes Course," in the Foreign Policy Association's "Great Decisions 2015."

    Crossette won the George Polk award for her coverage in India of the assassination of Rajiv Gandhi in 1991 and the 2010 Shorenstein Prize for her writing on Asia.

    South African Decision to Quit the ICC Draws Critics in Africa and Beyond

    by  • October 24, 2016 • Africa, ICC, International Justice • 

    Jacob Zuma

    South Africa’s announcement on Oct. 21 that it intends to withdraw from the International Criminal Court, which has jurisdiction over war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide, has met strong opposition from civil society groups in that country and other African and international human-rights organizations. Africa has played major roles in the independent court,...

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    Young US Graduates Falter in Knowledge of World Affairs, a Survey Finds

    by  • October 7, 2016 • Education • 


    In a crucial political year when candidates’ knowledge — or ignorance — of international affairs and foreign policy are topics among public debate in the United States, a new survey of what young Americans of college age, many of them first-time voters, really know about the world produced some sobering findings. The joint survey, commissioned...

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    Ban Ki-moon’s Turbulent UN Years, in His Own Words

    by  • September 21, 2016 • General Assembly, Secretary-General, Security Council • 2 Comments

    Ban Ki-moon receives the Seoul Peace Prize in South Korea on Oct. 29, 2012, with his wife, Yoo Soon-taek.

    With a cease-fire in Syria collapsing around him and bombs destroying precious relief supplies intended for the hungry, traumatized survivors of relentless government attacks on the once grand city of Aleppo, United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon used his last speech to open a UN General Assembly debating season to lash out at the government...

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    Targeted Attacks and Curbs on Media Rising in South Asia

    by  • September 15, 2016 • Asia • 


    The countries of South Asia, stretching from Afghanistan to the Burmese border, have enjoyed a large measure of press freedom, with relatively few long interruptions, since the days of British colonialism. Recently, however, reports of episodes of violence and intimidation of journalists have been emerging across the region, where India is the dominant power....

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    A New Year at the UN: Getting Serious About Global Disorder?

    by  • September 12, 2016 • General Assembly, Migration, Refugees, UN-NY Relations, US-UN Relations • 

    DAVOS/SWITZERLAND, 28JAN11 - Angela Merkel, Federal Chancellor of Germany captured after the session 'Revitalizing Global Trade' at the Annual Meeting 2011 of the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, January 28, 2011.Copyright by World Economic Forum swiss-image.ch/Photo by Sebastian Derungs

    Government leaders from around the world are gathering in New York for the opening on Tuesday of the 71st session of the United Nations General Assembly, an event haunted by momentous crises demanding undivided attention and action from all member countries. Responses in both the General Assembly (whose powers are limited) and the Security Council...

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    As China Becomes a Major Player in UN Peacekeeping, Will It Respond to Crises?

    by  • August 17, 2016 • Africa, Gender-Based Violence, Human Rights, Peace and Security, UN Peacekeeping • 

    Mission SK -Bukavu-Pakistani Brigade Medal Parade -23rd March 2011 Pakistani Blue Helmets brigade comprised of approximate 3500 personnel were given UN medals for their service in the UN Mission. The troops will be rotated by the end of May-2011. Photos MONUSCO/ Myriam Asmani

    As China has projected its economic and military power more widely not only in Asia but also in Africa and to some extent in Latin America, little notice has been paid by the general public to another arena of growing influence: United Nations peacekeeping. In coming weeks, the Chinese are expected to announce the...

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    Religious Intolerance Surges Worldwide, US Studies Confirm

    by  • August 15, 2016 • Human Rights, Refugees • 


    Burmese Buddhists attack Muslims and Christians. Indian Hindu zealots kill Muslims and Christians and trash their places of worship. In the Central African Republic, Muslims are driven from the country by Christians. The Middle East and parts of North Africa are aflame with sectarian violence, and religious minorities are the most vulnerable to persecution,...

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    Less Politics and More Transparency: What New Leadership Will Mean for the UN

    by  • July 6, 2016 • General Assembly, Secretary-General, UN Diplomats • 

    Mogens Lykketoft MANUEL ELIAS/UN PHOTO

    In a year when people who follow the United Nations are focusing on the election of the next secretary-general, the center of early action in that election has moved for the first time in history from the secretive deliberations of the Security Council to an unprecedented open campaign in the General Assembly, which normally...

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    New Candidates for Secretary-General Make Their Cases at the UN

    by  • June 7, 2016 • Secretary-General • 


    The field of nine candidates campaigning formally to become the next United Nations secretary-general grew by two on June 7, when Miroslav Lajcak, Slovakia’s foreign minister, and Susana Malcorra, who holds the same position in Argentina, spoke in public sessions lasting more than two hours each, taking questions from UN member delegates and civil...

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