• Barbara Crossette

    About Barbara Crossette

    Barbara Crossette is the senior consulting editor and writer for PassBlue, a fellow of the Ralph Bunche Institute for International Studies at The Graduate Center, CUNY, and the United Nations correspondent for The Nation. She is also a board member of the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

    Previously, Crossette was the UN bureau chief for The New York Times from 1994 to 2001 and before that its chief correspondent in Southeast Asia and South Asia. She is the author of "So Close to Heaven: The Vanishing Buddhist Kingdoms of the Himalayas," "The Great Hill Stations of Asia" and a Foreign Policy Association study, "India Changes Course," in the Foreign Policy Association's "Great Decisions 2015."

    Crossette won the George Polk award for her coverage in India of the assassination of Rajiv Gandhi in 1991 and the 2010 Shorenstein Prize for her writing on Asia.

    The UN Secretary-General Pushes Ahead on Peacekeeping Reform

    by  • March 16, 2018 • Peace and Security, Secretary-General, UN Peacekeeping, US-UN Relations • 

    Responding to a December request from the General Assembly for details on how he proposes to staff and pay for sweeping changes in political affairs and peacekeeping at the United Nations, Secretary-General António Guterres has drafted a 50-page explanation for member states to consider. The General Assembly had agreed in principle to his original...

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    Trump Team Wants to Slash Funds for Global Women’s Health by Half

    by  • February 18, 2018 • Health and Population, Humanitarian Aid, Poverty, Take a Look, US Foreign Relations • 

    There has yet to be a decision in United States Congress on what funds for global women’s health, if any, will survive in the current 2018 national budget, a decision that is nearly six months overdue. But Donald Trump and his vice president, Mike Pence, a hard-line social conservative who is playing a larger...

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    The ‘Incredible Courage’ of Asma Jahangir, Pakistan’s Human-Rights Advocate

    by  • February 17, 2018 • Asia, Human Rights, Women • 

    Only a few days before Pakistan’s most famous human-rights advocate, Asma Jahangir, was felled by a heart attack on Feb. 11, she was speaking out in support of a group of ethnic Pashtuns who had marched across the country from their homes along the Afghanistan border to protest military brutality. A Pashtun boy had...

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    A Trove of Resources for Navigating Our Angry World

    by  • February 6, 2018 • Governance, Journalists, Peace and Security, Take a Look • 

    In the dark shadows of rising populism and hypernationalistic leaders, attempts to intimidate reporters and curb the exchange of information are taking on less visibly crude but still dangerous forms. The menace, highlighted in the United States by Donald Trump’s contemptuous accusations against the press, television and social media, has global echoes. There is...

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    In Africa, Where the Pain of Trump’s ‘Racist’ Comments Runs Deep

    by  • January 17, 2018 • Africa, Caribbean, Geopolitics, US Foreign Relations, US-UN Relations • 1 Comment

    In the United States, the reaction to the bigoted comments that President Donald Trump made on Jan. 11 about black-majority nations in Africa didn’t take long to shift its focus to domestic American politics, obscuring the shock of those abroad who have been maligned. Around the world, a very different story is taking shape....

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    Zimbabwe Stuck With a Health Crisis Left by Mugabe Era

    by  • January 10, 2018 • Africa, Asia, Climate and Environment, Take a Look • 2 Comments

    Robert Mugabe, the only head of state that Zimbabwe had known since independence in 1980, was forced out of office by an unexpected coup in November 2017, and citizens of the economically battered country are now forced to tally the costs of his dictatorship. One of them is a health system in collapse. A...

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    Tackling Sexual Violence in Humanitarian NGOs

    by  • December 31, 2017 • Gender-Based Violence, Humanitarian Aid, Take a Look • 

    Nearly three years ago, Megan Nobert, a humanitarian worker in South Sudan, was drugged and raped by an employee of a United Nations agency, according to her account, made public six months later. That was when Nobert decided to form the advocacy group Report the Abuse to encourage others to tell their stories and...

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    David Miliband on Our Duty to the Strangers in Our Midst: Refugees

    by  • December 19, 2017 • Geopolitics, Poverty, Refugees • 

    David Miliband, a former British foreign secretary, has been president and chief executive of the International Rescue Committee since 2013, overseeing both the agency’s humanitarian relief operations and its refugee resettlement and assistance programs in several American cities. The son of European refugees from Nazi Germany, he just published his first book, “Rescue: Refugees and...

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    Is the US Going to Drop Out of the UN Human Rights Council?

    by  • December 17, 2017 • Geopolitics, Israeli-Palestinian conflict, Security Council, US Foreign Relations, US-UN Relations • 

    Palestinian causes in the United Nations are gaining wider and more active support in the Arab and Islamic worlds in light of Donald Trump’s recognition of Jerusalem as Israel’s capital, in defiance of global opinion and decades of UN resolutions. The move sets the scene for reigniting intense anti-UN activity in United States Congress....

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    Girl, Disrupted: How a Boarding School Shifted the Life of One Young Woman

    by  • December 13, 2017 • Asia, India, Poverty • 

    Shilpa Raj is not a Bollywood name, though she has starred in a documentary. She is not a best-selling author — yet. But she has written a frank, soulful book that can contribute to important discussions about the human costs of a disrupted childhood, however well-intentioned, based on her own extraordinary story. At the...

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    What a Stripped-Down State Department Bodes for the UN and Nikki Haley

    by  • November 26, 2017 • Middle East, Nikki Haley Watch, Nuclear Disarmament, US Foreign Relations • 

    In Washington, there is no question that the State Department is in a weakened position, a situation that the Trump White House — and the Trump family — seem to relish. To some in the understaffed, stripped-down Foreign Service and to commentators on United States foreign policy, this is a disgrace linked directly to...

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    In a World of Evolving UN Sanctions, an Emphasis on the Humanitarian Effects

    by  • January 13, 2018 • BOOKS, Nuclear Disarmament, Security Council • 

    Debates over how to deal with issues like North Korea’s nuclear weapons or the reliability of Iran to adhere to its role in a multiparty nuclear deal have brought questions about the value, design and human effects of sanctions to the fore at the United Nations and in national capitals. Are sanctions a tool...

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    Americans Want an Active Role in the World, Contrary to Trump’s Actions, a Poll Finds

    by  • November 14, 2017 • Climate and Environment, Take a Look, US Foreign Relations • 

      In the first week of November, more than 200 Americans who had been the beneficiaries of Fulbright international exchanges over many years went to the United States Congress to lobby members from across the country. They were asking their state representatives and senators not to strip the iconic, but now endangered, program of...

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    A Novel Idea: Putting Refugee Health Care Experts to Work

    by  • November 6, 2017 • Africa, Health and Population, Refugees • 

    With a record 65.6 million people displaced from their homes around the world — 22.5 million of them classified as refugees who have fled across borders — alarms are sounding about the health risks in overcrowded refugee settlements. Sanitation is soon overwhelmed, hygienic conditions rapidly deteriorate and malnutrition rises, contributing to the spread of...

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    TB in India: Drug-Resistant Strains Are ‘Out of Control,’ New Report Says

    by  • October 27, 2017 • Asia, Health and Population, India • 

    Stephen Lewis is an outspoken and often impassioned Canadian diplomat and former United Nations official with a lot of experience in tracking health crises in Africa. Now he has turned his attention to tuberculosis in India, where he made a fact-finding trip in early October. He was shocked and disheartened by what he saw...

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    Where the Hungriest People in the World Live

    by  • October 25, 2017 • Africa, Asia, Poverty, Take a Look • 

    The 2017 Global Hunger Index produced many sadly predictable findings but also worrying surprises. The report’s subtitle, “The Inequalities of Hunger,” suggests a reason. Naomi Hossain, the guest author of the report, looks at the power structures that can dictate every step of a food chain. “In food systems, power is exercised in a...

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    A Guide to Trump’s Global Edicts on Women’s Reproductive Health

    by  • October 16, 2017 • Development, Health and Population, Take a Look • 

    The Trump administration, which announced early this year that it would curtail American-funded women’s health services around the world that may be involved in any way in abortion, has turned its attention to curbing family planning in the United States. Rules have been issued with immediate effect that American women can no longer obtain...

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