• About Barbara Crossette

    Barbara Crossette is contributing editor and writer for PassBlue, a fellow of the Ralph Bunche Institute for International Studies at The Graduate Center, CUNY, and the United Nations correspondent for The Nation. She is also a board member of the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

    Previously, Crossette was the UN bureau chief for The New York Times from 1994 to 2001 and before that its chief correspondent in Southeast Asia and South Asia. She is the author of "So Close to Heaven: The Vanishing Buddhist Kingdoms of the Himalayas," "The Great Hill Stations of Asia" and a Foreign Policy Association study, "India Changes Course," in the Foreign Policy Association's "Great Decisions 2015."

    Crossette won the George Polk award for her coverage in India of the assassination of Rajiv Gandhi in 1991 and the 2010 Shorenstein Prize for her writing on Asia.

    In the US Congress, a Campaign Opens to ‘Punish’ the UN

    by  • December 26, 2016 • Security Council, US Foreign Relations, US-UN Relations • 

    It was inevitable that a triumphant Republican government in Washington, D.C., would sooner or later launch an assault on the United Nations. A near-unanimous UN Security Council resolution on Dec. 23 condemning Israeli settlements on Palestinians’ land provided the trigger. That the administration of President Barack Obama stood aside with an abstention, allowing a...

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    Note to Trump: US and Chinese Publics Want Their Nations to Be Active in World Affairs

    by  • December 20, 2016 • Asia, Governance, Peace and Security, US Foreign Relations • 

    Barely a day before Donald Trump set off a recent diplomatic crisis between China and the United States by backing Taiwan in a chatty phone call with the island’s president, the Chicago Council on Global Affairs published poll results from the US and China that found a surprising correlation between public attitudes in the...

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    Nikki Haley, as US Envoy to the UN, Could Empower Indian Business Ties

    by  • December 2, 2016 • Nuclear Disarmament, Security Council, US Foreign Relations, US-UN Relations • 

    Whatever the real reason that led Donald Trump to name Nikki Haley as his ambassador to the United Nations — that she is a “deal-maker,” a woman from an ethnic minority and a moderate Republican voice he may want to remove from South Carolina — a wave of justifiable pride in many Indians and...

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    Being UN Deputy Secretary-General: Louise Fréchette Recounts Her Experience

    by  • November 12, 2016 • General Assembly, US-UN Relations, Women • 

    Louise Fréchette, a Canadian, was the first United Nations deputy secretary-general. Appointed by Kofi Annan, she took office in March 1998, bringing to the job qualifications that exceeded those of most UN secretaries-general. She had spent a quarter-century in the Canadian foreign service, including as ambassador to several Latin American counties and to the...

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    Murders of Journalists by Militants Just Keep Coming, a Report Finds

    by  • November 2, 2016 • Journalists, Unesco • 

    Somalia, Iraq and Syria lead the world in the killing of journalists by Islamic extremists who get away with their crimes, but militants also continue to target the media with impunity in Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Nigeria and Pakistan, according to the latest report from the Committee to Protect Journalists, a nonprofit group based in New...

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    South African Decision to Quit the ICC Draws Critics in Africa and Beyond

    by  • October 24, 2016 • Africa, ICC, International Justice • 

    South Africa’s announcement on Oct. 21 that it intends to withdraw from the International Criminal Court, which has jurisdiction over war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide, has met strong opposition from civil society groups in that country and other African and international human-rights organizations. Africa has played major roles in the independent court,...

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    Young US Graduates Falter in Knowledge of World Affairs, a Survey Finds

    by  • October 7, 2016 • Education • 

    In a crucial political year when candidates’ knowledge — or ignorance — of international affairs and foreign policy are topics among public debate in the United States, a new survey of what young Americans of college age, many of them first-time voters, really know about the world produced some sobering findings. The joint survey, commissioned...

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    Ban Ki-moon’s Turbulent UN Years, in His Own Words

    by  • September 21, 2016 • General Assembly, Secretary-General, Security Council • 2 Comments

    Ban Ki-moon receives the Seoul Peace Prize in South Korea on Oct. 29, 2012, with his wife, Yoo Soon-taek.

    With a cease-fire in Syria collapsing around him and bombs destroying precious relief supplies intended for the hungry, traumatized survivors of relentless government attacks on the once grand city of Aleppo, United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon used his last speech to open a UN General Assembly debating season to lash out at the government...

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    Targeted Attacks and Curbs on Media Rising in South Asia

    by  • September 15, 2016 • Asia • 

    The countries of South Asia, stretching from Afghanistan to the Burmese border, have enjoyed a large measure of press freedom, with relatively few long interruptions, since the days of British colonialism. Recently, however, reports of episodes of violence and intimidation of journalists have been emerging across the region, where India is the dominant power....

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    A New Year at the UN: Getting Serious About Global Disorder?

    by  • September 12, 2016 • General Assembly, Migration, Refugees, UN-NY Relations, US-UN Relations • 

    Government leaders from around the world are gathering in New York for the opening on Tuesday of the 71st session of the United Nations General Assembly, an event haunted by momentous crises demanding undivided attention and action from all member countries. Responses in both the General Assembly (whose powers are limited) and the Security Council...

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