• Barbara Crossette

    About Barbara Crossette

    Barbara Crossette is the senior consulting editor and writer for PassBlue, a fellow of the Ralph Bunche Institute for International Studies at The Graduate Center, CUNY, and the United Nations correspondent for The Nation. She is also a board member of the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

    Previously, Crossette was the UN bureau chief for The New York Times from 1994 to 2001 and before that its chief correspondent in Southeast Asia and South Asia. She is the author of "So Close to Heaven: The Vanishing Buddhist Kingdoms of the Himalayas," "The Great Hill Stations of Asia" and a Foreign Policy Association study, "India Changes Course," in the Foreign Policy Association's "Great Decisions 2015."

    Crossette won the George Polk award for her coverage in India of the assassination of Rajiv Gandhi in 1991 and the 2010 Shorenstein Prize for her writing on Asia.

    Schools Fail the Youngest Where Population Grows the Fastest

    by  • June 20, 2012 • Africa, Education, Millennium Goals • 10 Comments

    Congolese children in an unfinished classroom at a primary school near the Kahe refugee camp in Goma, North Kivu Province.

    Optimists in many developing countries are convinced that their expanding youth populations will be engines of economic growth in coming decades. They call this the “demographic dividend.” Social scientists and demographers in those same nations, however, are usually more wary of the future, as they focus on how those children, on whom so much...

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    Rights Violations Tarnish Democracy in South Asia

    by  • June 5, 2012 • Asia, Human Rights • 5 Comments

    Cooks at the Tharanikulam Ganesh School in Vavunya, Sri Lanka

    The mind-numbing daily reports of death and destruction in Afghanistan and Pakistan obscure a larger issue: the prevalence of political and ethnic violence across South Asia, a region dominated by India that includes Nepal, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, the Maldives and Bhutan. Recently, the publication of two annual global reports on human rights – from...

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    A Top Economist Faults UNDP for Outmoded Policies

    by  • May 22, 2012 • Development • 1 Comment

    UNDP literacy program

    In a broadside against the United Nations Development Program, Jagdish Bhagwati, professor of economics at Columbia University and an adviser to the government of India and numerous international bodies, argues that the UN’s premier agency has declined in staff quality as it clings to outdated policies that actually harm poor countries. At the heart...

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    Native Americans Still Suffer ‘Profound Hurt,’ the UN Says

    by  • May 8, 2012 • Human Rights • 3 Comments

    apache dancers

    The relationship between the United States government and the United Nations machinery of human rights reporting has been a troubled one. Over the years, numerous UN rights monitors – called rapporteurs — have often been unwelcome visitors, sometimes refused permission to visit institutions like prisons or courts in some American states. The reception got...

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    Nagging Hunger Undermines Millennium Poverty Goal

    by  • May 2, 2012 • Development, Human Rights • 15 Comments

    eradicating hunger

    The first of the eight Millennium Development Goals makes an ambitious demand: eradicate extreme poverty and hunger worldwide. It is now widely accepted that progress has been made in many countries on cutting the percentage of people living with less than the rock-bottom $1.25 a day. But decreasing hunger by half is another sadder...

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