• BOOKS

    The Rules of War Need a Major Overhaul

    by  • December 3, 2016 • BOOKS, Human Rights, Peace and Security, Responsibility to Protect, Security Council • 

    Donetsk People's Republic fighters in Ukraine

    Evidence is piling up: the global security framework that emerged from the ashes of World War II is no longer capable of pursuing international peace. The arrangement, conceived by the major powers that won the war, has expanded into a grab bag of rules and institutions that the crises of our own era have...

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    Explaining the Nobel Peace Prize

    by  • November 26, 2016 • BOOKS • 

    Barack Obama, a senator from Illinois in this picture, with Wangari, on Aug. 28, 2006. FREDRICK ONYANGO/CREATIVE COMMONS

    Since 1901, Nobel Prizes have been presented to the designated laureates at ceremonies held on Dec. 10 , the anniversary of Alfred Nobel’s death. As stipulated in his will, the prizes in physics, chemistry, physiology or medicine and literature are awarded in Stockholm, presented by the King of Sweden. The Nobel Peace Prize is...

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    In Rio, the Middle Class Awakens to Demand Its Due

    by  • October 29, 2016 • BOOKS • 

    Rio carnival Coroadode Jocarepagua

    Rio de Janeiro is a spectacular city, situated between mountains and the ocean, broad enough to encompass a national forest and the justly famous beaches of Ipanema and Copacabana. It’s the subject of song and story, and this year it pulled off a spectacular and joyous Olympic games. Rio is also a city of...

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    Confronting a Father’s Sex Change and a ‘New Self’

    by  • August 27, 2016 • BOOKS • 

    Susan Faludi, the author, with her father, Stefanie. RUSS RYMER/COURTESY SUSAN FALUDI

    In 2004, the American writer Susan Faludi, the author of “Backlash: The Undeclared War Against American Women,” received an email from her estranged father, Steven, announcing that he had undergone sex-reassignment surgery and was no longer, according to him, “impersonating a macho aggressive man that I have never been inside.” It wasn’t the news,...

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    Africa’s War Problem

    by  • July 12, 2016 • BOOKS • 

    An artisanal miner in southern Mali. JOE PENNEY/REUTERS

    Too much of Africa is a mess. While there are, of course, great success stories, many countries continue, despite the end of colonialism and the Cold War, to suffer wildly from poverty, illness, corruption, coups and wars — too many compared with the rest of the world. Even as an outsized slice of United...

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    Ancient Rome: An Empire With Surprising Relevance Today

    by  • April 2, 2016 • BOOKS • 

    An painting depictingf ancient Rome's slave market, by Gustave Boulanger, from 1881. CREATIVE COMMONS

    Who isn’t fascinated by ancient Rome, which continues to engage our imaginations: how did the Romans have the engineering skills to construct those enormous buildings, and entertain us with statues, plays and art and inform our politics? The Cambridge University professor of classics and blogger Mary Beard’s “SPQR: A History of Ancient Rome,” which...

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    Falling Flat in Syria: How Not to Fight Jihad

    by  • February 20, 2016 • BOOKS • 

    tktktk

    Sun Tzu’s classic work on the art of war advises would-be warriors to “know your enemy.” What were Western powers and the United Nations thinking when they first pondered ways to stop Syrian President Bashar al-Assad from beating, torturing, bombing and even gassing his own people after the first hesitant protests against his rigid...

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