• Barbara Crossette

    About Barbara Crossette

    Barbara Crossette is the senior consulting editor and writer for PassBlue and the United Nations correspondent for The Nation. She is also a board member of the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. She is a contribtor to the Oxford Handbook on the United Nations.

    Previously, Crossette was the UN bureau chief for The New York Times from 1994 to 2001 and before that its chief correspondent in Southeast Asia and South Asia. She is the author of "So Close to Heaven: The Vanishing Buddhist Kingdoms of the Himalayas," "The Great Hill Stations of Asia" and a Foreign Policy Association study, "India Changes Course," in the Foreign Policy Association's "Great Decisions 2015."

    Crossette won the George Polk award for her coverage in India of the assassination of Rajiv Gandhi in 1991 and the 2010 Shorenstein Prize for her writing on Asia.

    The UN Shudders as ‘Trump Week’ Closes In

    by  • September 19, 2018 • General Assembly, Geopolitics, Security Council, US Foreign Relations, US-UN Relations • 

    A year after his bombastic debut at the United Nations as president of the United States, Donald Trump returns on Monday, Sept. 24, to lead a US effort to spur global action to stem the narcotics and opioid plagues. Could the US be asking the UN for help this time? The morning meeting on...

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    Kashmir’s Long Tragedy Rears Its Head in the News and at the UN

    by  • September 5, 2018 • Asia, General Assembly, Geopolitics, Security Council, US Foreign Relations, US-UN Relations • 

    In his final months in office as United Nations high commissioner for human rights, the outspoken Zeid Ra’ad al-Hussein did what no former holder of that office would or could do: he issued a blistering report on Indian abuses in the disputed territory of Kashmir. It is a story that Indian governments have long...

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    Kofi Annan, 80, a Popular UN Secretary-General From Africa, Is Dead

    by  • August 18, 2018 • Africa, Secretary-General • 

    Kofi Annan, the seventh and probably the most popular and widely respected secretary-general the United Nations has ever known, died unexpectedly in Bern, Switzerland, early on Saturday morning, Aug. 18. His death, reportedly from leukemia, followed what initial reports described only as a short illness. He led the UN for two terms, from 1997...

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    Two Health Alerts: Resurgent Polio and Antibiotic Resistance

    by  • August 23, 2018 • Health and Population, Refugees, Take a Look • 

    Recent research reports published by The Lancet could make a lot of people rethink the assumption that once a disease has been declared eradicated, that’s it. Done. A recent resurge in cases of polio in several countries and concern in Europe that antibiotic resistance is being bought there by refugees and migrants are becoming...

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    Hungary Forbids Gender Studies, Enraging Academics

    by  • August 14, 2018 • Gender-Based Violence, Human Rights, Women • 1 Comment

    In the doldrums of a European summer, when many universities are mostly closed or short-staffed, the populist Hungarian government of Prime Minister Viktor Orban sent a directive to higher-education institutions on Aug. 9 forbidding the teaching of gender studies. Hungarian academicians, faculties outside the country as well as civil society organizations reacted quickly, calling...

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    Michelle Bachelet of Chile Nominated to Be Next UN Rights Commissioner

    by  • August 8, 2018 • Human Rights, Secretary-General, Women • 

    United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres has nominated Michelle Bachelet, a former president of Chile, to become the next UN high commissioner for human rights. The nomination has been sent to the General Assembly for approval. Bachelet, who is 66, was Guterres’s top choice all along in the selection process, which began informally in the...

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    Once Again, Haley Accuses Others for US Failure at Rights Council Reform

    by  • July 22, 2018 • General Assembly, Human Rights, Nikki Haley Watch • 

    In the middle of last week, when the Trump administration was still unable to say how it “lost” more than 2,500 children torn from their asylum-seeking parents at the border with Mexico, Nikki Haley, the United States envoy to the United Nations, was telling a different story to a sympathetic group in Washington, D.C....

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    UN to Rohingya: You Can’t Go Home Safely Any Time Soon

    by  • July 15, 2018 • Asia, Gender-Based Violence, Human Rights, Refugees • 

    Among refugee advocates there  has been a growing concern that recent agreements among regional governments and the United Nations on a framework for mitigating the Rohingya crisis could prompt at least some of the million-plus people who have fled the deadly military pogrom in Myanmar to consider risking a return to try to rebuild...

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    Tough Times for Legislators as More Women and Youth Still Fall Short

    by  • July 17, 2018 • Governance, Take a Look • 

    Marking the first International Day of Parliamentarians on June 28, the Inter-Parliamentary Union, representing legislators in 173 countries, reported that serious challenges are emerging as antidemocratic forces playing on public apathy increase. In a survey of legislatures worldwide in 2018, “Are Parliamentary Democracies in Danger?” the global parliamentary union finds huge challenges to these...

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    Trump’s Nominee Lost the UN Migration Agency Vote. Is It a Signal?

    by  • July 2, 2018 • Geopolitics, Migration, US Foreign Relations, US-UN Relations • 2 Comments

    The unexpected, decisive rejection of the Trump administration’s candidate to head the premier United Nations agency for resettling refugees and other migrants appears to be a warning. Which is that other nations are not prepared to indefinitely defer to the power of the United States when human rights and democratic values are assaulted by...

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    As Expected, the US Quits the UN Human Rights Council

    by  • June 19, 2018 • Human Rights, Nikki Haley Watch, US Foreign Relations, US-UN Relations • 2 Comments

    In a long-expected decision, the United States announced it was withdrawing from the United Nations Human Rights Council, the world body’s primary organ for promoting and protecting the rights of people worldwide. US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and the US ambassador to the UN, Nikki Haley, delivered comments on June 19 in the...

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    As Refugees Await Their Futures, NGOs Offer New Ways to Help Them Prepare

    by  • June 22, 2018 • Migration, Refugees, Take a Look • 

    As the school year ends in many countries and children turn with joy to vacation time ahead, millions of other school-age children will have nothing to look forward to but more long days in overcrowded refugee camps. The situation gets worse as they grow into adulthood. Recent studies show that, thanks to United Nations...

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    With Trump’s Human-Rights Policies, Religious ‘Values’ Take Priority

    by  • June 7, 2018 • Gender-Based Violence, Health and Population, Human Rights, US Foreign Relations, US-UN Relations • 

    Cubans waiting to be served food during the country's annual celebration of its revolution.

    For almost three centuries, through street protests, court battles and a civil war, the United States has sporadically but steadily advanced and expanded human-rights protections and commitments in domestic and foreign policies. Now Donald Trump and the most conservative, ideologically driven officials on his team want to turn back this record in fundamental ways,...

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    In Year 2 of Trump Presidency, the US Is Still Eroding Both the UN and Women’s Rights

    by  • May 21, 2018 • Human Rights, Humanitarian Aid, Middle East, Nikki Haley Watch, US Foreign Relations, US-UN Relations • 

    After a year of bombast and threats by Ambassador Nikki Haley and the ever-evolving Donald Trump administration, the tone appears to be turned down a few notches in the second year of the Trump presidency. But efforts to undermine the United Nations and what it stands for have not stopped, at least for now,...

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    In Nunavut, Poor Health Care Shortens Indigenous People’s Lives

    by  • May 14, 2018 • Gender-Based Violence, Health and Population • 

    Canada’s national health system, the envy of many people in other countries, including in the United States, is being more scrutinized from Canadians as reports reveal serious health-service gaps in the territory of Nunavut, a self-governing province populated by mostly Inuit people. Critical reports of deprivation and neglect emerging from Nunavut paint a picture...

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    Europe’s Contraception Gaps: They May Be Wider Than You Think

    by  • April 29, 2018 • Climate and Environment, Health and Population, Take a Look • 

    It is a continent where almost half of the pregnancies are unplanned, where government agencies do not provide enough information on available contraception, where geography is destiny for those needing reliable family planning advice. This is not a developing region, but 21st-century Europe, according to the recently published 2018 Contraception Atlas. The atlas, presented...

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    South Africa’s Light on Human Rights Dims Again at the UN

    by  • April 17, 2018 • Africa, Human Rights, US Foreign Relations, US-UN Relations • 

    When the monthlong winter session of the United Nations Human Rights Council opened at the end of February, expectations were high that progress would be made on reforms demanded by the United States and supported by many other nations, although not in as threatening terms as those of Nikki Haley, the Trump administration’s ambassador...

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